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Amy Campbell

Amy Campbell
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acampbell@vpico.com

Be a Social Media Master: Tips to Brand Your Business Without Being a 'Marketer'

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By Amy Campbell

Over the past few months I’ve made a concentrated effort to be more active on PDD’s two main social networking outlets: Facebook (Facebook.com/VIRGO.ProfessionalDoorDealer) and Twitter (DoorDealer). I’ve posted comments about a variety of things including new articles and other content on the PDD website, congratulated industry professionals on milestones such as anniversaries or awards, and even asked for input on upcoming PDD articles or polls.

It’s also wonderful to see I’m not the only one taking initiative on these social media platforms. I’m happy to report there are dozens of door dealers from all over the U.S. and beyond also participating. Industry suppliers and manufacturers are making their mark as well.

While I have a better understanding of how to utilize these social media sites to promote my business, which is the PDD brand, than I did even six months ago, I’m probably still not doing everything correctly. So I was pleased to come across an article about all the things business owners are doing wrong when it comes to social media. Written by Dave Kerpen, author of  "Likeable Social Media: How to Delight Your Customers, Create an Irresistible Brand, and Be Generally Amazing on Facebook and Other Social Networks," the article says business owners have to stop thinking about a marketer and start thinking like a customer. He says, “... the secret to social media is in the ‘social’ more than in the ‘media’—it's in being human.”

Not surprising, his first tip is to listen more. And rather than just telling people to follow you on Twitter or Facebook, you need to show them why they should follow you. Basically, what’s in it for them? I’m not talking about offering a discount either. Rather you should impart information that only you have, such as garage door safety tips, new products, industry insight or an interesting article your followers might like. These are all good ways to be “human” rather than a marketer.

Kerpen also suggests posting pictures and videos, and to even pose questions to your followers. Again, this shows you’re not there just to push your service but actually be a part of the community and you have their well-being at heart.

Lastly, Kerpen says you do have to spend time cultivating your social media programs. It doesn’t have to be hours every day, but it does need to be consistent. Twitter makes this easy with short posts. And who says every Facebook post has to be half a page long? Take a cue from your teenagers and post short comments every few days, share a joke or photo, or an interesting article. You just might attract more followers who will, hopefully, become loyal customers. 

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